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Hit Song

What’s that coming over the hill…is it a monster……???

A few nice hit song images I found:

What’s that coming over the hill…is it a monster……???
hit song

Image by –Tico–
If you’ve listened to Radio 1 in the UK recently you may have come across the ‘Monster’ song from ‘The Automatic’ . If you don’t know it you can listen to it here:
www.myspace.com/theautomatic
I think it’s going to be a huge hit. This phrase particularly stays in your head forever and all sorts of (really funny) alternatives are being suggested instead of monster.

Here’s my version: The Maybug

The number of views for this pic has rocketed in the last few days. Can anyone tell me if it is linked elsewhere?

Bang, Bang
hit song

Image by Xtream_i
Music played and people sang
Just for me the church bells rang

Now She’s gone. I don’t know why
And till this day, sometimes I cry
She didn’t even say goodbye
She didn’t take the time to lie

Bang bang, She shot me down
Bang bang, I hit the ground
Bang bang, that awful sound
Bang bang, my baby shot me down

By: Nancy Sinatra How Does That Grap You? 1995

Nice Hit Song photos

Check out these hit song images:

Soldier Show performs with social media theme 100921
hit song

Image by familymwr
(Photo by Jon Connor, Army Sustainment Command Public Affairs)

www.armymwr.com

Soldier Show performs with social media theme 100921

By Jon Connor
Army Sustainment Command Public Affairs

DAVENPORT, Iowa (Sept. 21, 2010) — Focusing this year on a theme of social media to reflect the lifestyle of today’s youth, the 2010 Soldier Show left a packed house at Adler Theater Sept. 14 ecstatic — if audience reaction is any indicator.

The title theme this year is "Soldier Show v.27.0" which marked the 27th year since the re-establishment of the modern show as one of the Army’s marketing crown jewels and marks the computer revolution that began in 1983.

"This year we recognize the impact of technology on the Army, its personnel and the ‘connected’ nature of the country we protect," explained Maj. Gen. Reuben D. Jones, commanding general of the Family and Morale, Welfare, and Recreation Command, headquartered at Fort Belvoir, Va., in the Soldier Show program handout.

"Today’s Soldiers incorporate technological innovations into almost every aspect of their daily lives. Our Army is in a state of transformation as we use these technologies here at home and on the battlefield," Jones said. "We’re adapting new technology, like social media, to help keep Soldiers connected with their families and friends no matter where the mission takes them."

Following the performance, Joel Himsl, garrison manager, Rock Island Arsenal, accepted a framed gift on behalf of RIA and presented one to Soldier Show personnel.

This year’s set design employs a semi-transparent screen lowered onto the stage between songs, displaying internet images. A click of a virtual mouse introduced the next genre of music.

As usual in a variety show, there was a mix of gospel, country, rock’n'roll, and heavy metal during the 75-minute production.

The screen rose as Soldier Show performers came out to dance, sing, and play instruments.

This year’s use of instruments was slightly different than in past years. A "group" consisting of drums, bass, keyboards and guitar were positioned not as a close-proximity combo, but rather spread across the stage to blend in with their dancing and singing comrades.

For many, the show’s highlight was Sgt. Kevin Cherry, assigned to the 3rd Infantry Division Band, Fort Stewart, Ga. He hit the stage in a wig and glittery black and silver clothes — and wearing that famous glove — in a tribute to Michael Jackson.

Cherry moon-danced and sang his way through Jackson’s "Billie Jean," mesmerizing some attendees with his spot-on dance routine.

"Being on stage brings me much joy and peace. Participating in the Soldier Show provides that peace and allows me to share it with my fellow Soldiers," Cherry stated in the program handout. "I truly love and respect the stage."

The cast includes 22 Soldier-performers and four military crew members. Backing them are 13 military cadre and dedicated Army Entertainment civilians, all working hard to support the Soldier Show from initial tryouts to the last bow.

Not only do cast members perform, but they are also responsible for the show’s production and logistics, moving 40,000 pounds of technical equipment to more than 50 locations in the United States and Europe.

According the FMWRC website, the kick-off show was April 23 at Fort Belvoir, Va. The tour is scheduled to end Nov. 25, Thanksgiving Day, at Camp Casey, South Korea.

Connect with us:
www.Facebook.com/FamilyMWR
www.Twitter.com/FamilyMWR
www.YouTube.com/FamilyMWR

ks 100923

Soldier Show performs with social media theme 100921
hit song

Image by familymwr
(Photo by Jon Connor, Army Sustainment Command Public Affairs)

www.armymwr.com

Soldier Show performs with social media theme 100921

By Jon Connor
Army Sustainment Command Public Affairs

DAVENPORT, Iowa (Sept. 21, 2010) — Focusing this year on a theme of social media to reflect the lifestyle of today’s youth, the 2010 Soldier Show left a packed house at Adler Theater Sept. 14 ecstatic — if audience reaction is any indicator.

The title theme this year is "Soldier Show v.27.0" which marked the 27th year since the re-establishment of the modern show as one of the Army’s marketing crown jewels and marks the computer revolution that began in 1983.

"This year we recognize the impact of technology on the Army, its personnel and the ‘connected’ nature of the country we protect," explained Maj. Gen. Reuben D. Jones, commanding general of the Family and Morale, Welfare, and Recreation Command, headquartered at Fort Belvoir, Va., in the Soldier Show program handout.

"Today’s Soldiers incorporate technological innovations into almost every aspect of their daily lives. Our Army is in a state of transformation as we use these technologies here at home and on the battlefield," Jones said. "We’re adapting new technology, like social media, to help keep Soldiers connected with their families and friends no matter where the mission takes them."

Following the performance, Joel Himsl, garrison manager, Rock Island Arsenal, accepted a framed gift on behalf of RIA and presented one to Soldier Show personnel.

This year’s set design employs a semi-transparent screen lowered onto the stage between songs, displaying internet images. A click of a virtual mouse introduced the next genre of music.

As usual in a variety show, there was a mix of gospel, country, rock’n'roll, and heavy metal during the 75-minute production.

The screen rose as Soldier Show performers came out to dance, sing, and play instruments.

This year’s use of instruments was slightly different than in past years. A "group" consisting of drums, bass, keyboards and guitar were positioned not as a close-proximity combo, but rather spread across the stage to blend in with their dancing and singing comrades.

For many, the show’s highlight was Sgt. Kevin Cherry, assigned to the 3rd Infantry Division Band, Fort Stewart, Ga. He hit the stage in a wig and glittery black and silver clothes — and wearing that famous glove — in a tribute to Michael Jackson.

Cherry moon-danced and sang his way through Jackson’s "Billie Jean," mesmerizing some attendees with his spot-on dance routine.

"Being on stage brings me much joy and peace. Participating in the Soldier Show provides that peace and allows me to share it with my fellow Soldiers," Cherry stated in the program handout. "I truly love and respect the stage."

The cast includes 22 Soldier-performers and four military crew members. Backing them are 13 military cadre and dedicated Army Entertainment civilians, all working hard to support the Soldier Show from initial tryouts to the last bow.

Not only do cast members perform, but they are also responsible for the show’s production and logistics, moving 40,000 pounds of technical equipment to more than 50 locations in the United States and Europe.

According the FMWRC website, the kick-off show was April 23 at Fort Belvoir, Va. The tour is scheduled to end Nov. 25, Thanksgiving Day, at Camp Casey, South Korea.

Connect with us:
www.Facebook.com/FamilyMWR
www.Twitter.com/FamilyMWR
www.YouTube.com/FamilyMWR

ks 100923

Soldier Show performs with social media theme 100921

A few nice hit song images I found:

Soldier Show performs with social media theme 100921
hit song

Image by familymwr
(Photo by Jon Connor, Army Sustainment Command Public Affairs)

www.armymwr.com

Soldier Show performs with social media theme 100921

By Jon Connor
Army Sustainment Command Public Affairs

DAVENPORT, Iowa (Sept. 21, 2010) — Focusing this year on a theme of social media to reflect the lifestyle of today’s youth, the 2010 Soldier Show left a packed house at Adler Theater Sept. 14 ecstatic — if audience reaction is any indicator.

The title theme this year is "Soldier Show v.27.0" which marked the 27th year since the re-establishment of the modern show as one of the Army’s marketing crown jewels and marks the computer revolution that began in 1983.

"This year we recognize the impact of technology on the Army, its personnel and the ‘connected’ nature of the country we protect," explained Maj. Gen. Reuben D. Jones, commanding general of the Family and Morale, Welfare, and Recreation Command, headquartered at Fort Belvoir, Va., in the Soldier Show program handout.

"Today’s Soldiers incorporate technological innovations into almost every aspect of their daily lives. Our Army is in a state of transformation as we use these technologies here at home and on the battlefield," Jones said. "We’re adapting new technology, like social media, to help keep Soldiers connected with their families and friends no matter where the mission takes them."

Following the performance, Joel Himsl, garrison manager, Rock Island Arsenal, accepted a framed gift on behalf of RIA and presented one to Soldier Show personnel.

This year’s set design employs a semi-transparent screen lowered onto the stage between songs, displaying internet images. A click of a virtual mouse introduced the next genre of music.

As usual in a variety show, there was a mix of gospel, country, rock’n'roll, and heavy metal during the 75-minute production.

The screen rose as Soldier Show performers came out to dance, sing, and play instruments.

This year’s use of instruments was slightly different than in past years. A "group" consisting of drums, bass, keyboards and guitar were positioned not as a close-proximity combo, but rather spread across the stage to blend in with their dancing and singing comrades.

For many, the show’s highlight was Sgt. Kevin Cherry, assigned to the 3rd Infantry Division Band, Fort Stewart, Ga. He hit the stage in a wig and glittery black and silver clothes — and wearing that famous glove — in a tribute to Michael Jackson.

Cherry moon-danced and sang his way through Jackson’s "Billie Jean," mesmerizing some attendees with his spot-on dance routine.

"Being on stage brings me much joy and peace. Participating in the Soldier Show provides that peace and allows me to share it with my fellow Soldiers," Cherry stated in the program handout. "I truly love and respect the stage."

The cast includes 22 Soldier-performers and four military crew members. Backing them are 13 military cadre and dedicated Army Entertainment civilians, all working hard to support the Soldier Show from initial tryouts to the last bow.

Not only do cast members perform, but they are also responsible for the show’s production and logistics, moving 40,000 pounds of technical equipment to more than 50 locations in the United States and Europe.

According the FMWRC website, the kick-off show was April 23 at Fort Belvoir, Va. The tour is scheduled to end Nov. 25, Thanksgiving Day, at Camp Casey, South Korea.

Connect with us:
www.Facebook.com/FamilyMWR
www.Twitter.com/FamilyMWR
www.YouTube.com/FamilyMWR

ks 100923

Soldier Show performs with social media theme 100921
hit song

Image by familymwr
(Photo by Jon Connor, Army Sustainment Command Public Affairs)

www.armymwr.com

Soldier Show performs with social media theme 100921

By Jon Connor
Army Sustainment Command Public Affairs

DAVENPORT, Iowa (Sept. 21, 2010) — Focusing this year on a theme of social media to reflect the lifestyle of today’s youth, the 2010 Soldier Show left a packed house at Adler Theater Sept. 14 ecstatic — if audience reaction is any indicator.

The title theme this year is "Soldier Show v.27.0" which marked the 27th year since the re-establishment of the modern show as one of the Army’s marketing crown jewels and marks the computer revolution that began in 1983.

"This year we recognize the impact of technology on the Army, its personnel and the ‘connected’ nature of the country we protect," explained Maj. Gen. Reuben D. Jones, commanding general of the Family and Morale, Welfare, and Recreation Command, headquartered at Fort Belvoir, Va., in the Soldier Show program handout.

"Today’s Soldiers incorporate technological innovations into almost every aspect of their daily lives. Our Army is in a state of transformation as we use these technologies here at home and on the battlefield," Jones said. "We’re adapting new technology, like social media, to help keep Soldiers connected with their families and friends no matter where the mission takes them."

Following the performance, Joel Himsl, garrison manager, Rock Island Arsenal, accepted a framed gift on behalf of RIA and presented one to Soldier Show personnel.

This year’s set design employs a semi-transparent screen lowered onto the stage between songs, displaying internet images. A click of a virtual mouse introduced the next genre of music.

As usual in a variety show, there was a mix of gospel, country, rock’n'roll, and heavy metal during the 75-minute production.

The screen rose as Soldier Show performers came out to dance, sing, and play instruments.

This year’s use of instruments was slightly different than in past years. A "group" consisting of drums, bass, keyboards and guitar were positioned not as a close-proximity combo, but rather spread across the stage to blend in with their dancing and singing comrades.

For many, the show’s highlight was Sgt. Kevin Cherry, assigned to the 3rd Infantry Division Band, Fort Stewart, Ga. He hit the stage in a wig and glittery black and silver clothes — and wearing that famous glove — in a tribute to Michael Jackson.

Cherry moon-danced and sang his way through Jackson’s "Billie Jean," mesmerizing some attendees with his spot-on dance routine.

"Being on stage brings me much joy and peace. Participating in the Soldier Show provides that peace and allows me to share it with my fellow Soldiers," Cherry stated in the program handout. "I truly love and respect the stage."

The cast includes 22 Soldier-performers and four military crew members. Backing them are 13 military cadre and dedicated Army Entertainment civilians, all working hard to support the Soldier Show from initial tryouts to the last bow.

Not only do cast members perform, but they are also responsible for the show’s production and logistics, moving 40,000 pounds of technical equipment to more than 50 locations in the United States and Europe.

According the FMWRC website, the kick-off show was April 23 at Fort Belvoir, Va. The tour is scheduled to end Nov. 25, Thanksgiving Day, at Camp Casey, South Korea.

Connect with us:
www.Facebook.com/FamilyMWR
www.Twitter.com/FamilyMWR
www.YouTube.com/FamilyMWR

ks 100923

101 Sky Deck Fountain

A few nice hit song images I found:

101 Sky Deck Fountain
hit song

Image by libraryman
David Lee King and I are working on a new song and video called "Library 101". Our last song and video "hi-fi sci-fi library" was a big hit in Libraryland and we’re at it again! You can be in the video by uploading a picture of YOU with a 0 and a 1 and tagging it library101 . Look for the song and video in October of 2009!! Details blogged here: <a href="http://www.libraryman.com/blog/2009/07/17/new-songvideo-announcement-and-call-for-participation/"

101 Sky Deck Waterfront
hit song

Image by libraryman
David Lee King and I are working on a new song and video called "Library 101". Our last song and video "hi-fi sci-fi library" was a big hit in Libraryland and we’re at it again! You can be in the video by uploading a picture of YOU with a 0 and a 1 and tagging it library101 . Look for the song and video in October of 2009!! Details blogged here: <a href="http://www.libraryman.com/blog/2009/07/17/new-songvideo-announcement-and-call-for-participation/"

Shaddap You Face – Joe Dolce

Classic 80′s comedy song. Joe Dolce was born in Painesville, Ohio USA and has lived in Australia for many years
Video Rating: 4 / 5

Opposite of Adults – Chiddy Bang

Chiddy Bang with their new hit song Opposite Of Adults…………. its AWSOME
Video Rating: 4 / 5

en.wikipedia.org This is a vintage live performance by Jeannie C. Riley of her hit song, “Harper Valley PTA”, written by Tom T. Hall. Riley was born in 1945 in Anson, Texas. This song immediately became a gigantic hit for Riley and went to number one on both the Billboard Pop and Country charts, a feat not repeated until 1981 when Dolly Parton released “9 to 5″. Riley and the song became an overnight sensation, and the song earned her the Grammy Award for Best Female Country Vocal Performance and the Country Music Association Single of the Year award. Riley also became one of the very few country artists ever nominated in the major pop Grammy categories of “Best New Artist” and “Record of the Year”. The song was a phenomenon which led to Riley making country music history in 1969 as the first female vocalist to have her own major network variety special, “Harper Valley USA” Then in 1978 there was “Harper Valley PTA” the motion picture, and in 1981 “Harper Valley PTA” the television show. *Recommend “high quality” mode. The video is much clearer that way. Click option above view count to switch modes, or go here www.youtube.com to save your preference for all videos you watch on YouTube.

Eminem- No Love Feat Lil Wayne (Recovery)

Eminem new hit song no love featuring Lil wayne explicit
Video Rating: 4 / 5

Soldier Show performs with social media theme 100921

Some cool hit song images:

Soldier Show performs with social media theme 100921
hit song

Image by familymwr
(Photo by Jon Connor, Army Sustainment Command Public Affairs)

www.armymwr.com

Soldier Show performs with social media theme 100921

By Jon Connor
Army Sustainment Command Public Affairs

DAVENPORT, Iowa (Sept. 21, 2010) — Focusing this year on a theme of social media to reflect the lifestyle of today’s youth, the 2010 Soldier Show left a packed house at Adler Theater Sept. 14 ecstatic — if audience reaction is any indicator.

The title theme this year is "Soldier Show v.27.0" which marked the 27th year since the re-establishment of the modern show as one of the Army’s marketing crown jewels and marks the computer revolution that began in 1983.

"This year we recognize the impact of technology on the Army, its personnel and the ‘connected’ nature of the country we protect," explained Maj. Gen. Reuben D. Jones, commanding general of the Family and Morale, Welfare, and Recreation Command, headquartered at Fort Belvoir, Va., in the Soldier Show program handout.

"Today’s Soldiers incorporate technological innovations into almost every aspect of their daily lives. Our Army is in a state of transformation as we use these technologies here at home and on the battlefield," Jones said. "We’re adapting new technology, like social media, to help keep Soldiers connected with their families and friends no matter where the mission takes them."

Following the performance, Joel Himsl, garrison manager, Rock Island Arsenal, accepted a framed gift on behalf of RIA and presented one to Soldier Show personnel.

This year’s set design employs a semi-transparent screen lowered onto the stage between songs, displaying internet images. A click of a virtual mouse introduced the next genre of music.

As usual in a variety show, there was a mix of gospel, country, rock’n'roll, and heavy metal during the 75-minute production.

The screen rose as Soldier Show performers came out to dance, sing, and play instruments.

This year’s use of instruments was slightly different than in past years. A "group" consisting of drums, bass, keyboards and guitar were positioned not as a close-proximity combo, but rather spread across the stage to blend in with their dancing and singing comrades.

For many, the show’s highlight was Sgt. Kevin Cherry, assigned to the 3rd Infantry Division Band, Fort Stewart, Ga. He hit the stage in a wig and glittery black and silver clothes — and wearing that famous glove — in a tribute to Michael Jackson.

Cherry moon-danced and sang his way through Jackson’s "Billie Jean," mesmerizing some attendees with his spot-on dance routine.

"Being on stage brings me much joy and peace. Participating in the Soldier Show provides that peace and allows me to share it with my fellow Soldiers," Cherry stated in the program handout. "I truly love and respect the stage."

The cast includes 22 Soldier-performers and four military crew members. Backing them are 13 military cadre and dedicated Army Entertainment civilians, all working hard to support the Soldier Show from initial tryouts to the last bow.

Not only do cast members perform, but they are also responsible for the show’s production and logistics, moving 40,000 pounds of technical equipment to more than 50 locations in the United States and Europe.

According the FMWRC website, the kick-off show was April 23 at Fort Belvoir, Va. The tour is scheduled to end Nov. 25, Thanksgiving Day, at Camp Casey, South Korea.

Connect with us:
www.Facebook.com/FamilyMWR
www.Twitter.com/FamilyMWR
www.YouTube.com/FamilyMWR

ks 100923

Soldier Show performs with social media theme 100921
hit song

Image by familymwr
(Photo by Jon Connor, Army Sustainment Command Public Affairs)

www.armymwr.com

Soldier Show performs with social media theme 100921

By Jon Connor
Army Sustainment Command Public Affairs

DAVENPORT, Iowa (Sept. 21, 2010) — Focusing this year on a theme of social media to reflect the lifestyle of today’s youth, the 2010 Soldier Show left a packed house at Adler Theater Sept. 14 ecstatic — if audience reaction is any indicator.

The title theme this year is "Soldier Show v.27.0" which marked the 27th year since the re-establishment of the modern show as one of the Army’s marketing crown jewels and marks the computer revolution that began in 1983.

"This year we recognize the impact of technology on the Army, its personnel and the ‘connected’ nature of the country we protect," explained Maj. Gen. Reuben D. Jones, commanding general of the Family and Morale, Welfare, and Recreation Command, headquartered at Fort Belvoir, Va., in the Soldier Show program handout.

"Today’s Soldiers incorporate technological innovations into almost every aspect of their daily lives. Our Army is in a state of transformation as we use these technologies here at home and on the battlefield," Jones said. "We’re adapting new technology, like social media, to help keep Soldiers connected with their families and friends no matter where the mission takes them."

Following the performance, Joel Himsl, garrison manager, Rock Island Arsenal, accepted a framed gift on behalf of RIA and presented one to Soldier Show personnel.

This year’s set design employs a semi-transparent screen lowered onto the stage between songs, displaying internet images. A click of a virtual mouse introduced the next genre of music.

As usual in a variety show, there was a mix of gospel, country, rock’n'roll, and heavy metal during the 75-minute production.

The screen rose as Soldier Show performers came out to dance, sing, and play instruments.

This year’s use of instruments was slightly different than in past years. A "group" consisting of drums, bass, keyboards and guitar were positioned not as a close-proximity combo, but rather spread across the stage to blend in with their dancing and singing comrades.

For many, the show’s highlight was Sgt. Kevin Cherry, assigned to the 3rd Infantry Division Band, Fort Stewart, Ga. He hit the stage in a wig and glittery black and silver clothes — and wearing that famous glove — in a tribute to Michael Jackson.

Cherry moon-danced and sang his way through Jackson’s "Billie Jean," mesmerizing some attendees with his spot-on dance routine.

"Being on stage brings me much joy and peace. Participating in the Soldier Show provides that peace and allows me to share it with my fellow Soldiers," Cherry stated in the program handout. "I truly love and respect the stage."

The cast includes 22 Soldier-performers and four military crew members. Backing them are 13 military cadre and dedicated Army Entertainment civilians, all working hard to support the Soldier Show from initial tryouts to the last bow.

Not only do cast members perform, but they are also responsible for the show’s production and logistics, moving 40,000 pounds of technical equipment to more than 50 locations in the United States and Europe.

According the FMWRC website, the kick-off show was April 23 at Fort Belvoir, Va. The tour is scheduled to end Nov. 25, Thanksgiving Day, at Camp Casey, South Korea.

Connect with us:
www.Facebook.com/FamilyMWR
www.Twitter.com/FamilyMWR
www.YouTube.com/FamilyMWR

ks 100923

Soldier Show performs with social media theme 100921
hit song

Image by familymwr
(Photo by Jon Connor, Army Sustainment Command Public Affairs)

www.armymwr.com

Soldier Show performs with social media theme 100921

By Jon Connor
Army Sustainment Command Public Affairs

DAVENPORT, Iowa (Sept. 21, 2010) — Focusing this year on a theme of social media to reflect the lifestyle of today’s youth, the 2010 Soldier Show left a packed house at Adler Theater Sept. 14 ecstatic — if audience reaction is any indicator.

The title theme this year is "Soldier Show v.27.0" which marked the 27th year since the re-establishment of the modern show as one of the Army’s marketing crown jewels and marks the computer revolution that began in 1983.

"This year we recognize the impact of technology on the Army, its personnel and the ‘connected’ nature of the country we protect," explained Maj. Gen. Reuben D. Jones, commanding general of the Family and Morale, Welfare, and Recreation Command, headquartered at Fort Belvoir, Va., in the Soldier Show program handout.

"Today’s Soldiers incorporate technological innovations into almost every aspect of their daily lives. Our Army is in a state of transformation as we use these technologies here at home and on the battlefield," Jones said. "We’re adapting new technology, like social media, to help keep Soldiers connected with their families and friends no matter where the mission takes them."

Following the performance, Joel Himsl, garrison manager, Rock Island Arsenal, accepted a framed gift on behalf of RIA and presented one to Soldier Show personnel.

This year’s set design employs a semi-transparent screen lowered onto the stage between songs, displaying internet images. A click of a virtual mouse introduced the next genre of music.

As usual in a variety show, there was a mix of gospel, country, rock’n'roll, and heavy metal during the 75-minute production.

The screen rose as Soldier Show performers came out to dance, sing, and play instruments.

This year’s use of instruments was slightly different than in past years. A "group" consisting of drums, bass, keyboards and guitar were positioned not as a close-proximity combo, but rather spread across the stage to blend in with their dancing and singing comrades.

For many, the show’s highlight was Sgt. Kevin Cherry, assigned to the 3rd Infantry Division Band, Fort Stewart, Ga. He hit the stage in a wig and glittery black and silver clothes — and wearing that famous glove — in a tribute to Michael Jackson.

Cherry moon-danced and sang his way through Jackson’s "Billie Jean," mesmerizing some attendees with his spot-on dance routine.

"Being on stage brings me much joy and peace. Participating in the Soldier Show provides that peace and allows me to share it with my fellow Soldiers," Cherry stated in the program handout. "I truly love and respect the stage."

The cast includes 22 Soldier-performers and four military crew members. Backing them are 13 military cadre and dedicated Army Entertainment civilians, all working hard to support the Soldier Show from initial tryouts to the last bow.

Not only do cast members perform, but they are also responsible for the show’s production and logistics, moving 40,000 pounds of technical equipment to more than 50 locations in the United States and Europe.

According the FMWRC website, the kick-off show was April 23 at Fort Belvoir, Va. The tour is scheduled to end Nov. 25, Thanksgiving Day, at Camp Casey, South Korea.

Connect with us:
www.Facebook.com/FamilyMWR
www.Twitter.com/FamilyMWR
www.YouTube.com/FamilyMWR

ks 100923

Soldier Show performs with social media theme 100921

Some cool hit song images:

Soldier Show performs with social media theme 100921
hit song

Image by familymwr
(Photo by Jon Connor, Army Sustainment Command Public Affairs)

www.armymwr.com

Soldier Show performs with social media theme 100921

By Jon Connor
Army Sustainment Command Public Affairs

DAVENPORT, Iowa (Sept. 21, 2010) — Focusing this year on a theme of social media to reflect the lifestyle of today’s youth, the 2010 Soldier Show left a packed house at Adler Theater Sept. 14 ecstatic — if audience reaction is any indicator.

The title theme this year is "Soldier Show v.27.0" which marked the 27th year since the re-establishment of the modern show as one of the Army’s marketing crown jewels and marks the computer revolution that began in 1983.

"This year we recognize the impact of technology on the Army, its personnel and the ‘connected’ nature of the country we protect," explained Maj. Gen. Reuben D. Jones, commanding general of the Family and Morale, Welfare, and Recreation Command, headquartered at Fort Belvoir, Va., in the Soldier Show program handout.

"Today’s Soldiers incorporate technological innovations into almost every aspect of their daily lives. Our Army is in a state of transformation as we use these technologies here at home and on the battlefield," Jones said. "We’re adapting new technology, like social media, to help keep Soldiers connected with their families and friends no matter where the mission takes them."

Following the performance, Joel Himsl, garrison manager, Rock Island Arsenal, accepted a framed gift on behalf of RIA and presented one to Soldier Show personnel.

This year’s set design employs a semi-transparent screen lowered onto the stage between songs, displaying internet images. A click of a virtual mouse introduced the next genre of music.

As usual in a variety show, there was a mix of gospel, country, rock’n'roll, and heavy metal during the 75-minute production.

The screen rose as Soldier Show performers came out to dance, sing, and play instruments.

This year’s use of instruments was slightly different than in past years. A "group" consisting of drums, bass, keyboards and guitar were positioned not as a close-proximity combo, but rather spread across the stage to blend in with their dancing and singing comrades.

For many, the show’s highlight was Sgt. Kevin Cherry, assigned to the 3rd Infantry Division Band, Fort Stewart, Ga. He hit the stage in a wig and glittery black and silver clothes — and wearing that famous glove — in a tribute to Michael Jackson.

Cherry moon-danced and sang his way through Jackson’s "Billie Jean," mesmerizing some attendees with his spot-on dance routine.

"Being on stage brings me much joy and peace. Participating in the Soldier Show provides that peace and allows me to share it with my fellow Soldiers," Cherry stated in the program handout. "I truly love and respect the stage."

The cast includes 22 Soldier-performers and four military crew members. Backing them are 13 military cadre and dedicated Army Entertainment civilians, all working hard to support the Soldier Show from initial tryouts to the last bow.

Not only do cast members perform, but they are also responsible for the show’s production and logistics, moving 40,000 pounds of technical equipment to more than 50 locations in the United States and Europe.

According the FMWRC website, the kick-off show was April 23 at Fort Belvoir, Va. The tour is scheduled to end Nov. 25, Thanksgiving Day, at Camp Casey, South Korea.

Connect with us:
www.Facebook.com/FamilyMWR
www.Twitter.com/FamilyMWR
www.YouTube.com/FamilyMWR

ks 100923

Soldier Show performs with social media theme 100921
hit song

Image by familymwr
(Photo by Jon Connor, Army Sustainment Command Public Affairs)

www.armymwr.com

Soldier Show performs with social media theme 100921

By Jon Connor
Army Sustainment Command Public Affairs

DAVENPORT, Iowa (Sept. 21, 2010) — Focusing this year on a theme of social media to reflect the lifestyle of today’s youth, the 2010 Soldier Show left a packed house at Adler Theater Sept. 14 ecstatic — if audience reaction is any indicator.

The title theme this year is "Soldier Show v.27.0" which marked the 27th year since the re-establishment of the modern show as one of the Army’s marketing crown jewels and marks the computer revolution that began in 1983.

"This year we recognize the impact of technology on the Army, its personnel and the ‘connected’ nature of the country we protect," explained Maj. Gen. Reuben D. Jones, commanding general of the Family and Morale, Welfare, and Recreation Command, headquartered at Fort Belvoir, Va., in the Soldier Show program handout.

"Today’s Soldiers incorporate technological innovations into almost every aspect of their daily lives. Our Army is in a state of transformation as we use these technologies here at home and on the battlefield," Jones said. "We’re adapting new technology, like social media, to help keep Soldiers connected with their families and friends no matter where the mission takes them."

Following the performance, Joel Himsl, garrison manager, Rock Island Arsenal, accepted a framed gift on behalf of RIA and presented one to Soldier Show personnel.

This year’s set design employs a semi-transparent screen lowered onto the stage between songs, displaying internet images. A click of a virtual mouse introduced the next genre of music.

As usual in a variety show, there was a mix of gospel, country, rock’n'roll, and heavy metal during the 75-minute production.

The screen rose as Soldier Show performers came out to dance, sing, and play instruments.

This year’s use of instruments was slightly different than in past years. A "group" consisting of drums, bass, keyboards and guitar were positioned not as a close-proximity combo, but rather spread across the stage to blend in with their dancing and singing comrades.

For many, the show’s highlight was Sgt. Kevin Cherry, assigned to the 3rd Infantry Division Band, Fort Stewart, Ga. He hit the stage in a wig and glittery black and silver clothes — and wearing that famous glove — in a tribute to Michael Jackson.

Cherry moon-danced and sang his way through Jackson’s "Billie Jean," mesmerizing some attendees with his spot-on dance routine.

"Being on stage brings me much joy and peace. Participating in the Soldier Show provides that peace and allows me to share it with my fellow Soldiers," Cherry stated in the program handout. "I truly love and respect the stage."

The cast includes 22 Soldier-performers and four military crew members. Backing them are 13 military cadre and dedicated Army Entertainment civilians, all working hard to support the Soldier Show from initial tryouts to the last bow.

Not only do cast members perform, but they are also responsible for the show’s production and logistics, moving 40,000 pounds of technical equipment to more than 50 locations in the United States and Europe.

According the FMWRC website, the kick-off show was April 23 at Fort Belvoir, Va. The tour is scheduled to end Nov. 25, Thanksgiving Day, at Camp Casey, South Korea.

Connect with us:
www.Facebook.com/FamilyMWR
www.Twitter.com/FamilyMWR
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ks 100923

Soldier Show performs with social media theme 100921
hit song

Image by familymwr
(Photo by Jon Connor, Army Sustainment Command Public Affairs)

www.armymwr.com

Soldier Show performs with social media theme 100921

By Jon Connor
Army Sustainment Command Public Affairs

DAVENPORT, Iowa (Sept. 21, 2010) — Focusing this year on a theme of social media to reflect the lifestyle of today’s youth, the 2010 Soldier Show left a packed house at Adler Theater Sept. 14 ecstatic — if audience reaction is any indicator.

The title theme this year is "Soldier Show v.27.0" which marked the 27th year since the re-establishment of the modern show as one of the Army’s marketing crown jewels and marks the computer revolution that began in 1983.

"This year we recognize the impact of technology on the Army, its personnel and the ‘connected’ nature of the country we protect," explained Maj. Gen. Reuben D. Jones, commanding general of the Family and Morale, Welfare, and Recreation Command, headquartered at Fort Belvoir, Va., in the Soldier Show program handout.

"Today’s Soldiers incorporate technological innovations into almost every aspect of their daily lives. Our Army is in a state of transformation as we use these technologies here at home and on the battlefield," Jones said. "We’re adapting new technology, like social media, to help keep Soldiers connected with their families and friends no matter where the mission takes them."

Following the performance, Joel Himsl, garrison manager, Rock Island Arsenal, accepted a framed gift on behalf of RIA and presented one to Soldier Show personnel.

This year’s set design employs a semi-transparent screen lowered onto the stage between songs, displaying internet images. A click of a virtual mouse introduced the next genre of music.

As usual in a variety show, there was a mix of gospel, country, rock’n'roll, and heavy metal during the 75-minute production.

The screen rose as Soldier Show performers came out to dance, sing, and play instruments.

This year’s use of instruments was slightly different than in past years. A "group" consisting of drums, bass, keyboards and guitar were positioned not as a close-proximity combo, but rather spread across the stage to blend in with their dancing and singing comrades.

For many, the show’s highlight was Sgt. Kevin Cherry, assigned to the 3rd Infantry Division Band, Fort Stewart, Ga. He hit the stage in a wig and glittery black and silver clothes — and wearing that famous glove — in a tribute to Michael Jackson.

Cherry moon-danced and sang his way through Jackson’s "Billie Jean," mesmerizing some attendees with his spot-on dance routine.

"Being on stage brings me much joy and peace. Participating in the Soldier Show provides that peace and allows me to share it with my fellow Soldiers," Cherry stated in the program handout. "I truly love and respect the stage."

The cast includes 22 Soldier-performers and four military crew members. Backing them are 13 military cadre and dedicated Army Entertainment civilians, all working hard to support the Soldier Show from initial tryouts to the last bow.

Not only do cast members perform, but they are also responsible for the show’s production and logistics, moving 40,000 pounds of technical equipment to more than 50 locations in the United States and Europe.

According the FMWRC website, the kick-off show was April 23 at Fort Belvoir, Va. The tour is scheduled to end Nov. 25, Thanksgiving Day, at Camp Casey, South Korea.

Connect with us:
www.Facebook.com/FamilyMWR
www.Twitter.com/FamilyMWR
www.YouTube.com/FamilyMWR

ks 100923

Cool Hit Song images

A few nice hit song images I found:

Impact – Promise
hit song

Image by Dajakika
Live Hip Hop Performances at "The Official Underground Homecoming Block Party & VIP Event" sponsored by Mandown-IP and Cut Up Bad Entertainment. Held at the Underground Nite Club – Greensboro, NC – Saturday, Oct. 11, 2008.

Big Face Mob – Fhat Rob & Zilla Man
hit song

Image by Dajakika
Live Hip Hop Performances at "The Official Underground Homecoming Block Party & VIP Event" sponsored by Mandown-IP and Cut Up Bad Entertainment. Held at the Underground Nite Club – Greensboro, NC – Saturday, Oct. 11, 2008.