iTunes & App Store
iTunes & App Store
Apple iTunes
Buy.com

More

More

In 1969 the band collaborated with filmmaker Barbet Schroeder to provide the soundtrack to the film More. The new Discovery version presents the original studio album, digitally remastered by James Guthrie and reissued with newly designed Digipak and a new 12 page booklet designed by Storm Thorgerson.

 

The ‘Discovery’ collection: 14 Remastered Studio Albums

Since 1967 Pink Floyd have produced one of the most outstanding and enduring catalogues in the history of recorded music. All 14 original Studio albums have now been painstakingly digitally remastered by James Guthrie (co-producer of The Wall), and are reissued with newly crafted packaging and booklets created by the band’s long-time artwork collaborator Storm Thorgerson.

‘Discovery’ albums are designed as an introduction to the artist, with all booklets including full album lyrics.

List Price: $ 18.99

Price: $ 10.96

3 Responses to More

  • Terrence J. Reardon "Classic rock and old sch... says:
    38 of 39 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Pink Floyd’s third album (and first full soundtrack) gets a stellar sonic upgrade, November 6, 2011
    This review is from: More (Audio CD)
    English art rockers Pink Floyd’s third album Soundtrack From the Film More, was released in July of 1969.
    More was the band’s second film score. Their first was for a movie called The Committee in 1968, which was not ever released until recently (only on DVD). Then, French film director Barbet Schroder (whom would go on to direct Single White Female, Reversal of Fortune, Barfly and La Vallee (which was another movie Pink Floyd would do the film score for and release as the Obscured by Clouds album (see review approached the band to do the film score for his film More.
    More was a story of love and betrayal set on the then hippie island of Ibiza. The band went to Abbey Road Studios and also Pye Studios in London to record the score to the film and emerged with 13 tracks (half with vocals and half instrumental) in just over a week.
    Five of the tracks were written by bass player/singer Roger Waters, and are all excellent songs. All of those tracks had guitarist/singer David Gilmour on lead vocals (More was the first full album with Gilmour on all tracks).
    The somber but beautiful “Cirrus Minor” opens the album with excellent acoustic work before ending with superb organ work from keyboard player Rick Wright. Next was “The Nile Song”, which was the closest that Pink Floyd got to performing heavy metal. The light and somewhat breezy “Crying Song” follows and is good as well. Rick Wright and drummer Nick Mason’s aggressive and powerful drums-and-piano workout “Up the Khyber” follows. The next Waters penned track was the superb “Green Is The Colour”, which would be in Pink Floyd’s set list throughout 1969 and 1970 and is a great song. The exquisite “Cymbaline” follows and is one of my all-time favorite Floyd songs, that song was also a staple of their live shows during their 1969, 1970 and 1971 tours. The brief but superb percussion piece “Party Sequence” ends the first half.
    Most of the second half is instrumentals (all penned by the band except “A Spanish Piece” penned by Gilmour). It starts with the trippy space-rock of “Main Theme”, which musically predates the sounds on “Shine on You Crazy Diamond” by six years. “Ibiza Bar”, which is basically the sister rocker to The Nile Song, is the only song with vocals on this half but is very good. The equally-brief blues riff of “More Blues” is next and Floyd would play a variation of this live in their shows in 1971 and once on their 1977 tour. The wild sounds of “Quicksilver” follows and features just Rick’s keyboard work and Roger’s gong beating at its best. Gilmour plays a mighty classical guitar with goofy Spanish dialect on the classic “A Spanish Piece”. The album concludes with “Dramatic Theme”, another great instrumental with great Gilmour guitar work.
    This album was justly unlooked when released although it did hit the British Top 10. Then, after the success of Dark Side of the Moon, Harvest/Capitol reissued the More Soundtrack in the States in the summer of 1973 and peaked at #153. However, I didn’t discover this album until January 9, 1988 (two weeks before my 12th birthday) when I got it on cassette and loved at first listen (no lie).
    Now as part of the Why Pink Floyd? campaign, the album is re-released in a new remastered CD done superbly by James Guthrie an Joel Plante. It restores all the original artwork plus a booklet with lyrics and credits. The sound is superb and betters the 1996 remaster. The 1980s disc still sounded flat. For a 40 plus year old recording, this has held up!
    Highly recommended!

    0

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  • Philip Snyder says:
    51 of 59 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    Not an Album for Beginners, January 15, 2005
    By 
    Philip Snyder (Amherst, New York United States) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: More (Audio CD)
    If I had to pick, I would have to say that this is probably my least favorite Pink Floyd album. It is an incredibly languid (almost stagnant in spots), disjointed, half-hearted effort that never quite takes off. At least that’s how I’d remembered it. Yes it had been awhile, but I decided to break out the CD again before writing this review. I must admit, I’m glad I did, because it’s better than I’d remembered.

    To properly assess this recording, a few things should be considered. First, Pink Floyd was still very much a band in search of its sound. To say that More was “kind of experimental” is like saying Dark Side Of The Moon was “kind of successful”. Second, this was the band’s first effort at composing a full film score, and by all accounts it wasn’t a major picnic. This was due in large part to the supervision of director Barbet Schroeder. Third, the entire record was written and recorded in eight days. Even for an immensely talented band like Pink Floyd, this is hardly an ideal timeframe to create. Finally, unlike soundtracks of today where hits of established pop successes are merely compiled together to generate maximum revenue, the Floyd were composing directly to scenes in the movie (ie; moody sounds and incidental music). The result is that there are as many bizarre fragmented moments as there are actual songs.

    Considering all the above, one would likely expect a seriously flawed effort. However, despite all the failings of this record, the band managed to capture several moments of kaleidoscopic beauty. Songs range from the gentle acoustic breeze of Green Is The Color to the pounding rock of The Nile Song (and its evil twin, Ibiza Bar). In between there lies oddities of every sort, including a slight taste of blues; a touch of flamenco guitar (complete with comical “drunken Spaniard” ramblings); and the dark musings of Cymbaline (a song that would become a staple of their stage act for the next couple years). The tracks I find most interesting, however, are the three instrumentals: Main Theme, Quicksilver, and Dramatic Theme. Each are strange moody pieces that depend heavily on Rick Wright’s keyboard excursions. Percussion, bass, slide guitar, and various instrumental sounds (along with the intelligent use of panning in the mix) round out the sonic picture. What is created in each is a FEEL, if not quite a substantial song. What intrigues me most about them is that you can see where the band was headed. The songs are glimpses of Pink Floyd working towards their sound; something they will find in two years with the spectacular Meddle album. Perhaps not works of genius, but certainly works of curiosity.

    More is not a masterpiece. Nor is it a flop. It is merely a snapshot in time of a young band pushing their creative envelope on their way to musical greatness. Like all of their work, how you rate More depends largely on which facet of Pink Floyd you love most. Fans of the Barrett-led Floyd, who plunged the band into the unshakable image of trippy psychedelia, will probably enjoy it. Fans of what Pink Floyd became – soaring guitar solos, melodic music, and high concepts – will likely be disappointed. This is NOT an album for the beginner. If you are just a casual fan, I would suggest passing this up. An understanding of what Pink Floyd was all about and what they were trying to accomplish will probably allow you to appreciate it most. Start with The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn, and then move on to A Saucerful Of Secrets. If you find yourself eager to hear more, move on to this album. You may find that it has a pleasant surprise or two waiting for you.

    0

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  • Jeffrey J.Park says:
    18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    An overlooked and very experimental Pink Floyd album, November 19, 2006
    By 
    Jeffrey J.Park (Pennsylvania, USA) –
    (VINE VOICE)
      

    This review is from: More (Audio CD)
    Based on what I have read, Pink Floyd did this album because they wanted to start making movie scores. Released in 1969, this soundtrack to the counterculture melodrama More (directed by Barbet Schroeder) really is a very nice listen. From the pastoral serenity of the opening track, through the thunderous Nile Song and Ibiza Bar, and into the spacey and experimental instrumental passages, this is a great album that indicates (somewhat) the direction that Pink Floyd would take as they entered the 1970s. I guess it is worth mentioning that Pink Floyd would take the experimental approach of More to an even greater extent on the follow up Ummagumma (1969).

    The instrumental pieces are balanced by the vocal pieces on this, the Floyd’s third album, and although some have commented that Dave’s vocals sound “feeble” I actually think he sounds great (even on Green is the Colour). Dave’s spacey guitar playing is also right on track and he uses a great mix of electric and acoustic textures. With respect to the instrumental tracks there are some pieces that reflect Rick Wright’s interest in avant-garde composers (like Stockhausen) especially Up the Khyber, which features a “tribal” drum part by Nick Mason (who co-wrote the piece), some atonal playing on the organ and piano, and electronic effects. Other interesting pieces include the completely “out there” track Quicksilver, which is the most experimental and at 7 minutes the longest track on the whole album, along with the short piece Party Sequence, which features some great percussion parts. At the other end of the spectrum is the softer piece Green is the Colour, which features acoustic guitar, acoustic piano, along with a very soft bass part by Roger and a tiny bit of organ by Rick. Another piece in the acoustic vein is the Spanish Piece, which features some excellent flamenco-ish acoustic guitar playing by Dave.

    The Floyd even take on the blues with More Blues, although it is the blues as only Pink Floyd could play it – very psychedelic and spacey. The fact that Nick Mason does not play his drum kit all the way through, but rather in “fits and starts” also gives the piece a vaguely experimental feel.

    Unfortunately, albums like More, along with all of their pre-Dark Side of the Moon (1973) output and even Animals (1977) tend to fall through the cracks. This really is too bad given that the 1967-1972 timeframe was a very creative period in their career. Not to diminish the significant achievement of Dark Side of the Moon however, which brought progressive rock to an even wider audience and was an extremely significant work, it is just that I love Pink Floyd’s late 1960′s/early 1970s material. As such More is highly recommended along with Atom Heart Mother (1970), Meddle (1971); and Obscured by Clouds (1972). Although from 1977, Animals is also very highly recommended too.

    0

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No