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Frank Sinatra’s Greatest Hits

Frank Sinatra’s Greatest Hits

  • Greatest Hits!

Reprise FS 1025: Greatest Hits! by Frank Sinatra

List Price: $ 65.00

Price: $ 59.99

This Is Sinatra!

Released in 1956 as part of Capitol’s This Is series, This Is Sinatra! features essentials like ‘I’ve Got the World on a String,’ ‘Young at Heart’ and ‘Love and Marriage.’ This Is Sinatra! is Sinatra’s first collection of singles and B-sides.

List Price: $ 22.98

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6 Responses to Frank Sinatra’s Greatest Hits

  • Sarah Bellum says:
    16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    (Almost) obsolete hits collection, September 1, 2006
    By 
    Sarah Bellum (Dublin, OH United States) –
    This was one of the first CDs I ever bought, which was in 1989 while in high school. At that time, there was a dearth of Sinatra collections and I just wanted a starter CD. This is a decent collection of songs from the Reprise years, though not one I would purchase today due to the fact this material can be found on more recent, more comprehensive collections. Even though Amazon lists the original release date as 1961, I believe it was actually 1968. Many, if not all, of the songs on this collection were recorded after 1961. Note the title is “Greatest Hits,” not “Best Of.” These are songs that hit the pop charts and are not necessarily his best songs. Some are classic Sinatra, such as “Strangers in the Night,” “Summer Wind,” “It Was a Very Good Year,” and “That’s Life.” However, there are also some you might have never heard before, such as “Somewhere in Your Heart,” “Forget Domani” or “This Town.” These are not bad songs, yet are certainly not indicative of his best work. The essential songs in this collection can also be found on “Sinatra Reprise: The Very Good Years,” with one exception: “Somethin’ Stupid.” If it weren’t for the omission of this track from “The Very Good Years,” this collection would be completely obsolete. Furthermore, the twelve tracks on this disc run a total of just over thirty minutes. This might have been acceptable in 1968, but is ridiculous compared to today’s standards. To add insult to injury, this CD has not been digitally mastered; as such, a slight hiss can be heard. Even though there are some very good songs here, don’t bother with this CD. (At the time of this writing, this CD retails for $10.99. I certainly wouldn’t pay more than $5.00 for it)

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  • George O'Leary says:
    17 of 22 people found the following review helpful
    1.0 out of 5 stars
    Buy this album and you’ll be had, August 31, 2000
    By A Customer
    Don’t believe the title of this album unless you like falling for Barnum & Bailey hyperbole. This is NOT a Greatest Hits album. It is a compilation of Sinatra’s most commercially successful material from the mid-1960s. Commercially successful this music(?) was, but good most of it is NOT. “This Town”, “Tell her you love her”, “Forget Domani” and “The World We Knew” are dreadful pieces of mid-60′s schlock. “Summer Wind” and “It Was A Very Good Year” are the only really good recordings on this album, but you’d be better off buying the original albums from which those recordings are derived – “Strangers In The Night” and “September of My Years” respectively. Unless you’re not interested in discovering truly GREAT Sinatra, stay clear of this album!

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  • Anonymous says:
    3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Made For The Adult Contemporary (Easy Listening) Charts, August 12, 2007
    By 
    George O’Leary (Ottawa, Ontario, Canada) –
    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)
      

    Clearly, when compared to much of his Capitol and Columbia material, these do not count among Frank’s classic songs. However, they did appeal to enough people at the time to shoot them well up the Easy Listening [Adult Contemporary] charts, and even, to a lesser degree, the Billboard Pop Hot 100. So, to dismiss them as “commercial drek” is missing the point entirely. The man had to go on paying the bills [including alimony] and so why not churn out stuff that made the greater masses happy? Did they not count?

    What I don’t like about this album – which first appeared in vinyl in 1968 – is the title “greatest hits” and the meagre [1 page] of liner notes. Perhaps that was all they could squeeze onto the back of an LP in 1968, but for the CD release they could have at least added more background information AND a proper discography of the contents.

    As for the title, it would have been less misleading had they said “Greatest Hits At Reprise From 1964 to 1967″ because that is more or less what you’re getting here. In that period, working primarily with Jimmy Bowen [who once toiled with the Rhythm Orchids and Buddy Knox in the 1950s] and Sonny Burke [who had worked with Dinah Shore on many of her earlier hits], and often with the backing of Ernie Freeman, he had 16 Easy Listening/Adult Contemporary hits, 12 of which also made the Billboard Hot 100. Here you get 11 of those two-chart hits plus one that made only the AC charts [track 10 - # 10 AC and a Hot 100 "bubble under" at # 102 in the fall of 1965].

    The earliest hit covered here is Softly, As I Leave You which hit # 4 AC/# 27 Hot 100 in October 1964, followed by Somewhere In Your Heart which, in January 1965, rose to the same level on the AC charts but only # 32 Hot 100. They then skip over Anytime At All [# 11 AC/# 46 Hot 100 in April 1965] and instead include the lesser Tell Her (You Love Her Each Day), a # 16 AC/# 57 Hot 100 in June.

    Forget Domani was another lightweight entry from the film The Yellow Rolls-Royce, hitting # 13 AC/# 78 Hot 100 in August 1965, as was When Somebody Loves You [the AC-only hit mentioned above]. Rounding out 1965 was the double-sided AC hit I’ll Only Miss Her When I Think Of Her [# 18] b/w Everybody Has The Right To Be Wrong (At Least Once) – # 25 and a Hot 100 “bubble under” at # 131.

    The years 1966/67 were much kinder in terms of chart success with no less than six # 1 AC hits, two of which also made it to # 1 Hot 100. It Was A very Good Year, done by The Kingston Trio on their 1961 LP Goin’ Places, was the first to go # 1 AC [# 28 Hot 100], that being in February 1966 b/w Moment To Moment from the film of the same name, which also charted at # 18 AC/# 115 Hot 100 “bubble under” – but it’s not included here.

    Then came the smash Strangers In The Night [# 1 AC for 7 weeks and # 1 Hot 100 in June 1966], a song that Dean Martin had relinquished to Frank when he couldn’t get his chops around it at an album recording session. A bit of trivia that would have enhanced the liner notes, by the way. Summer Wind also went to # 1 AC [# 25 Hot 100] that October, beating out the Wayne Newton rendition, as did That’s Life for 4 weeks [# 4 Hot 100] in December.

    Early in 1967 he teamed with daughter Nancy for a # 1 AC [NINE weeks] and # 1 Hot 100 [four weeks] on Somethin’ Stupid, and that October registered his fifth straight AC # 1 [five weeks] with The World We Knew (Over And Over), which also made it to # 30 Hot 100. In December, This Town [from the film The Cool Ones] topped out at # 17 AC/# 53 Hot 100.

    So, in summary, six # 1 AC hits, two of which also reached # 1 Hot 100, spending a total of 26 weeks at the top AC slot and 101 weeks in total on the charts. Some may wish to slough this off as “commercial drek” but clearly millions did appreciate them.

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  • Stvwsn1 says:
    7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Sinatra, June 23, 2013
    By 
    Stvwsn1
    Verified Purchase(http://www.amazon.com/gp/community-help/amazon-verified-purchase/189-2051719-6919900', ‘AmazonHelp’, ‘width=400,height=500,resizable=1,scrollbars=1,toolbar=0,status=1′);return false; “>What’s this?)
    This review is from: This Is Sinatra (Audio CD)
    CD is awesome. I have the original album that the CD was cut from. Music selection is awesome and Frank’s voice is unmatchable. Several of the songs were made into movies with Sinatra singing the title song in front of the movie. My favorites are Three Coins in a Fountain because I’ve been to Rome twice and saw all the locations where the movie was made, Young At Heart my all time favorite, and From Here to Eternity. Definatelyt recommend it.

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  • Mustafa Jackson says:
    4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    SINATRA’S SWINGS INTO THE 50s, September 22, 2012
    By 
    Mustafa Jackson (New York, NY USA) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Verified Purchase(http://www.amazon.com/gp/community-help/amazon-verified-purchase/189-2051719-6919900', ‘AmazonHelp’, ‘width=400,height=500,resizable=1,scrollbars=1,toolbar=0,status=1′);return false; “>What’s this?)
    This review is from: This Is Sinatra (Audio CD)
    THIS IS SINATRA is one of my all-time favorite Sinatra albums of the 1950s. It has many of the great tunes that would establish Ol’ Blue Eyes as one of the greatest performers of his day. I have the LP but could never find a CD until a few months ago. I highly recommend this album for anyone who wants to know why Sinatra has become an icon in American Music, but mostly I recommend it for anyone who wants to know what good music is. This album starts off with a blast and lulls you into a sense of serenity and then knocks you about again until you get hooked.

    THIS IS SINATRA SWINGS!

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  • Diane C. Lore says:
    2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    NICE REISSUE ON VINYL, February 28, 2015
    By 
    Diane C. Lore (Staten Island, New York USA) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: This Is Sinatra! (Vinyl)
    Let’s be honest here….It’s a wonderful thing to buy Sinatra on brand new vinyl! UMe has done a beautiful job so far with their recent reissues – particularly regarding the Chairman’s Capitol material.

    Overall, THIS IS SINATRA sounds quite nice- even on a mid-level system. Just be aware, however, that this vinyl edition – unlike its Hi-Rez Download counterpart – was mastered with lots of BASS! While this might add a pleasant bottom end to some tracks like “Young At Heart”, “Rain” , or “Three Coins In The Fountain”, it might be perceived as a bit intrusive on some of the more swingin’ tracks.

    Bottom line: if you’re a SInatra fan and are looking to own this classic compilation in its original format, go for this reissue! Hear the Chairman’s voice nice and “dry” (i.e. without the fake stereo reverb audio atrocity that Capitol slathered over the master tapes in the 60s). ENJOY!

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