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Saucerful Of Secrets Reviews

Saucerful Of Secrets

  • Brand Name: WEA CORP Mfg#: 603497915033
  • Shipping Weight: 1.00 lbs
  • Manufacturer: PARLOPHONE/WEA
  • Genre: Popular Music
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The original studio album has been digitally remastered by James Guthrie (co-producer of THE WALL) and reissued with newly crafted packaging and booklet.

List Price: $ 18.98

Price: $ 15.98

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3 Responses to Saucerful Of Secrets Reviews

  • Alan Caylow says:
    88 of 98 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    A Saucerful Of Floyd, January 7, 2005
    By 
    Alan Caylow (USA) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: A Saucerful of Secrets (Audio CD)
    Released in 1968, Pink Floyd’s second album, “A Saucerful of Secrets,” shows the band in a transitional period. Singer/songwriter/guitarist Syd Barrett was ousted from the band due to his LSD use & erratic behavior (though the Floyd still allow him a final appearance at the album’s end). Taking Syd’s place was singer/guitarist David Gilmour, while bassist Roger Waters picked up the bulk of the songwriting duties, along with a pair of contributions from keyboardist Richard Wright. Some have criticized “Saucerful” as being a mixed bag, but I say that’s total nonsense, because I’ve always loved this album. Roger Waters branches out as a songwriter very well with his trio of trippy psychedelic rock songs, “Let There Be More Light,” “Set The Controls For The Heart Of The Sun,” and the very amusing “Corporal Clegg” (representing the first of Waters’ various war-themed songs, though this particular tune is done with humor, including a solo on kazoo). Richard Wright delivers a fine pair of atmospheric songs, “Remember A Day” and “See-Saw.” But the big centerpiece of the album is the 11-minute title track, an avant-garde, three-part instrumental in which the Floyd give the listener the aural equivalent of a war. The first part is the tension build-up, the middle section is the war (with drummer Nick Mason’s tribal percussion loop, Gilmour running his guitar up and down a microphone stand, Waters repeatedly smashing a gong, and Wright pounding his piano senseless), and the final part is the release, the calm after the battle. It’s an amazing piece, one of Pink Floyd’s best, and it points in the musical direction that the Floyd would take on future releases.But it is Syd Barrett who gets the final, haunting word on “Saucerful” with his Pink Floyd swansong, “Jugband Blues,” recorded just before his exit from the band, and which the Floyd rightfully saved for release on “Saucerful Of Secrets.” The song—featuring some very twisted lyrics and a cameo by a Salvation Army band—may indeed represent Barrett’s tragic fall into dementia, but he still sings it with tremendous feeling, and no diehard Floyd fan will ever forget Barrett’s final, jarring line, “And what exactly is a joke?”. “A Saucerful Of Secrets” is a terrific Pink Floyd album.

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  • W. Wilson says:
    38 of 41 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Psychedelic ‘Saucerful’ Sheds Sonic Secrets, September 27, 2011
    By 
    W. Wilson (Boxborough, MA) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Verified Purchase(http://www.amazon.com/gp/community-help/amazon-verified-purchase/185-6930238-4724810', ‘AmazonHelp’, ‘width=400,height=500,resizable=1,scrollbars=1,toolbar=0,status=1′);return false; “>What’s this?)
    This review is from: A Saucerful of Secrets (Audio CD)
    Pink Floyd’s second album always suffered from sonic problems.

    While the recording was done at EMI Studio’s Abbey Road from January 1968 to April 1968, the same studio where ‘Piper’ was recorded, the band’s arrangements became more complex, especially in the case of Rick Wright’s two songs.

    James Guthrie’s remastering of 1968′s ‘A Saucerful of Secrets,’ to these ears, sounds like nothing short of a rebirth of the album 43 years after its release.

    Consider “Remember a Day” and “See-Saw,” the latter which has tracks for piano, bass, drums, vocals, etc. and mellotron, plus assorted other instruments. Yet every song here benefits in some way from the remastering. “Corporal Clegg” sounds more menacing and bizarre than ever.

    “Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun” still sounds eerily mystical, but the experience of listening to it seems more personal. The same is true for the title track.

    Syd Barrett, who had contributed so much to the band’s first record, is now relegated to the final, famous track, “Jugband Blues,” which opens with “It’s awfully considerate of you to think of me here/And I’m most obliged to you for making it clear that I’m not here.”

    This is the third version of this album I’ve bought. Hearing this cleaned up version really is a treat.

    Two minor nits: I’m a bit disappointed upon pulling out the disc from its digipack that the powers that be didn’t reprint the striped “Tower” label. That would have been a nice touch.

    The other drawback is it’s a digipack.

    On the plus side, the CD comes with a 12-page booklet and lyrics, some of which I still contest; for example:

    “Marigolds are very much in love/But he doesn’t mind.”

    I always thought this was

    “There he goes so very much in love/But he doesn’t mind.”

    “There he goes…” makes more sense to me because he hasn’t yet picked up his sister to go to the playground (in to the “See-Saw land,” which I believe is a metaphor for childhood innocence).

    “Marigolds are very much in love?”

    Okay. Well, since it came out in 1968, maybe you simply had to be there.

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  • Jeffrey J.Park says:
    11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    The first signs of the classic Floyd sound appear, May 27, 2007
    By 
    Jeffrey J.Park (Pennsylvania, USA) –
    (VINE VOICE)
      

    Verified Purchase(http://www.amazon.com/gp/community-help/amazon-verified-purchase/185-6930238-4724810', ‘AmazonHelp’, ‘width=400,height=500,resizable=1,scrollbars=1,toolbar=0,status=1′);return false; “>What’s this?)
    This review is from: A Saucerful of Secrets (Audio CD)
    Released in 1968, this album was the first without Syd Barrett as a full member of the band (he did write and perform on Jugband Blues and played slide guitar on Remember a Day however) and also provided a major impetus for a good portion of the German experimental rock scene; influencing a number of bands including electronica giant Tangerine Dream. Although in some ways the product of a band getting used to a new lineup, I feel that this is still an excellent Pink Floyd album that has a great deal to offer any fan of progressive music.

    The lineup at this point included new member (and old friend) David Gilmour (electric and acoustic guitars; vocals); Rick Wright (mellotron, piano, organ, and vocals); Roger Waters (bass guitar, vocals); Nick Mason (drums and percussion); and on Jugband Blues/Remember a Day, Syd Barrett (vocals, electric guitar; slide guitar). Although Dave was never comfortable with his vocals skills at this point, I think he does a great job, as do all of the other members including Rick and Roger. Dave was a little bemused by what his new bandmates were asking him to do with his guitar, and he found himself playing the instrument with pieces of wood, and making other odd noises. The musical influences present on this album clearly indicate that the band was entering new territory and even Rick Wright started exploring his Stockhausen influences a bit further (especially on A Saucerful of Secrets). As a side note, the band was using a quadraphonic sound setup during this early stage and surrounding their audience with the music, which was yet another nod to avant-garde electronic composers; in this instance the reference was to Edgar Varese.

    Musically, this album is a bit removed from the excellent debut album, and is a little darker in mood (if that can be imagined). The album shows the band delving further into the electronic soundscapes that they would develop further over the next few years. I think that the lengthy (11’57″) A Saucerful of Secrets suite is an excellent example of this and brings together avant-garde electronic experimentation, Rick Wright’s “celestial” and spacey organ chords with tiny modulations, and large scale form into one place. Large scale composition is something that would develop further during the 1970s, and on this suite there is good use of dynamic range, and varying moods throughout. There is also the meditative and somewhat menacing Water’s piece Set the Controls for the heart of the Sun and two nice spacey psychedelic pieces loaded with mellotron by Rick Wright including Remember a Day and my personal favorite See Saw. Corporal Clegg marks the beginning of Roger Water’s increasing focus on his father’s death in the war and features (I think) a few riffs on the guitar from Syd. The truly odd track on the album is Syd Barretts’ Jugband blues, which is a chaotic mix of the Salvation Army Band (he told them to play whatever they felt like playing), kazoo, and his penchant for asymmetric and surreal lyrics. This would prove to be his last studio performance with the group.

    All in all, A Saucerful of Secrets is regarded by many folks as a weaker sophomore effort, although I feel that this is a pretty important album that demonstrates the direction the band would head in. Highly recommended along with Piper at the Gates of Dawn (1967); More (1969); Ummagumma (1969); Atom Heart Mother (1970); and Meddle (1971).

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