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Breaking Hearts

Breaking Hearts

Digitally remastered edition of John’s 1984 follow up to the resurgent success of “Too Low for Zero”. “Breaking Hearts” would produce two Top 10 singles in “Sad Songs (Say So Much”) and “Passengers”. This edition includes enhanced packaging and sleeve notes by John Tobler.

List Price: $ 11.99

Price: $ 5.58

MLC EYEWEAR ® Small Metal Round Circle Ozzy Elton John Color Tint Lennon Style Sunglasses (Silver, Red)

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These classic round metal sunglasses are inspired by the legends such as John Lennon, Ozzy Osbourne and Elton John. These retro sunnies feature a variety of color tinted lenses. Made with a metal based frame, metal hinges, and colored polycarbonate Lens.

List Price: $ 7.99

Price: $ 8.99

6 Responses to Breaking Hearts

  • Peter Durward Harris says:
    7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Another fine effort from Elton, May 28, 2009
    By 
    Peter Durward Harris (Leicester England) –
    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)
      
    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)
      

    This review is from: Breaking Hearts (Audio CD)
    It was always going to be hard to follow his hugely successful 1983 album, Too low for zero, which is regarded as something a comeback album. Not that Elton had ever been away, but his albums during the period 1977 to 1982 aren’t generally held in such high regard as most of his early albums released between 1970 and 1976. Actually, Elton’s albums from that period aren’t all as bad as some would have you believe. I enjoy some of them, particularly Blue moves and 21 at 33, but it would be fair to say that Elton made some mistakes during that period, the biggest by far being the album Victim of love. So the 1983 comeback (if that’s what it was) surprised a lot of people who had written Elton off as a has-been. But with this album, Elton proved that Too low for zero was no fluke. While Breaking hearts doesn’t quite match the brilliance of its predecessor, it comes close. With basically the same people involved, and the same recording studio in Montserrat (some years before the volcanic eruption that devastated the island), the sound and style is similar to Too low for zero, the difference being in the songs.

    Four of the songs here became British hits (though only two were big hits), while there were three hits in America, although only two hits were the same songs in both countries. The standout track on the album is Sad songs say so much. It made the American top five and the British top ten. The second and biggest British hit (where it made the top five) from the album was Passengers. The lyrics are difficult to understand, but the liner notes to this re-mastered CD suggest that it is actually about South African apartheid, so the train and its would-be passengers are metaphorical. Passengers never became an American single, for whatever reason. The third British single and the second American single was Who wears these shoes?. It made the top twenty in America but was only a minor British hit, perhaps because most people who wanted the song bought the album. The third American single, In neon, became a top forty hit there. In Britain, that song was relegated to the B-side, with the A-side being the album’s title track, but it was only a minor hit. Again, any Brits who wanted it probably already had the album.

    The five tracks already mentioned provide reasons enough to buy the album, but the other five tracks (Restless, Slow down Georgie she`s poison, Li’l ‘frigate, Burning bridges, Did he shoot her?) are all worth a listen. Perhaps the pick of them is Burning bridges, but there’s not a lot to choose between them quality-wise.

    Buying this album shouldn’t take precedence over Too low for zero or Elton’s classic albums of the early to mid-seventies. Nevertheless, every self-respecting committed Elton John fan should buy this album eventually.

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  • Keith T. Pells says:
    6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    EJ Says So Much…Breaking Hearts, July 10, 2003
    By 
    Keith T. Pells (Fort Myers, FL United States) –
    This review is from: Breaking Hearts (Audio CD)
    In 1984, a year after the success of his “Too Low For Zero” album, Elton John continued his resurgance with this album. And while the former album was picture-perfect in it’s arrangements and tight production values, “Breaking Hearts” went in the opposite direction, aiming more for a rock and (at times) country-esque feel. It was his most consistently rocking album since 1975′s “Rock Of The Westies”, as evident by the opening notes of the first track, “Restless”.
    The country-tinged lead single, “Sad Songs (Say So Much)”, rocketed to the Top 5 that Summer was all over the airwaves and media (thanks to a linkage of the song to Sassoon products). The video, like the one for his anthemic “I’m Still Standing” was memorable, with Elton in full video-mugging-for-the-camera mode.
    The follow-up single in America was “Who Wears These Shoes” (again with a country-tinge to it). It did nearly as well, peaking at #16. “Passengers” was released as the follow-up in the rest of the world. A percussive-reggae track dealing with racial tensions (“Deny the passenger, who wanna get on”), it was an oddity on the album, but hit the top of most European music charts.
    Other highlights include “Li’l Frigerator”, which is easily his best straight-out rock track since “Street Kids” on “Rock Of The Westies”. The title track is stripped down to EJ’s voice and piano and drives the loneliness of the lyrics dead home. A modest third single in America was “In Neon”, which is actually one of the few radio singles (that I can remember) to be written in a 3/4-waltz style and tempo. Again, very country-esque.
    But as with the other recently remastered albums from 1979-1984, this re-issue of “Breaking Hearts” would have been even better with bonus tracks (as done with his “Classic Years” re-issues). They could have added B-sides like “A Simple Man”, “Lonely Boy” and “Tortured”, thus giving the consumer (and the hard-core fans) more bang for the buck. *sigh*.
    But all in all, this is a strong, straight-ahead album, with the remastering enhancing the sound immencely. The packaging is also superb. Though still a “singles” artist during this time, “Breaking Hearts” is a worthy album in the piano-man’s illustrious catalog.
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  • Julien Walden says:
    2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Breaking Hearts: A Record of Its Time That’s Still Timeless, August 16, 2006
    By 
    Julien Walden (Austin, TX) –
    This review is from: Breaking Hearts (Audio CD)
    Breaking Hearts is the second record following the full-scale reunion of Elton John And Bernie Taupin, and it is a more than satisfactory listening experience. With a sound quite different from its predecessor, Too Low For Zero, Breaking Hearts is heavier on upbeat numbers and straight-up rockers, and it doesn’t have the light, almost airy feel of its predecessor. Too Low For Zero sounds almost as though it was recorded in a cloudbank; Breaking Hearts is firmly grounded upon the Earth. It comes right out of the gate with a state-of the world rocker called ‘Restless,’ a good example of Bernie Taupin’s sharp yet somehow blase social commentary; it goes on with ‘Slow Down Georgie (She’s Poison)’ a mid-tempo rocker about a friend who’s in the grip of a man-eater (and we’re not talkin’ ’bout lions or tigers here). Both songs stand up well as mid-’80s pop, and they manage not to sound too dated, unlike most musical fare from 1984. ‘Who Wears These Shoes?,’ another mid-tempo number, this one on the reliable old topic of infidelity (Bernie has written quite a few songs on that subject over the years; makes you wonder, doesn’t it?), comes next, sharing the quality of almost obscene catchiness that permeates most of this record. Whatever else one might say about it, Breaking Hearts has great hooks.

    The title track follows; it’s a slower, more piano-oriented song, a lament of the fact that it gets harder to love ‘em and leave ‘em as one gets older. Bernie Taupin certainly deserves some kind of credit for making the troubles of an utter cad sound so sympathetic. Next up we have the driving rocker ‘Lil ‘Frigerator,’ about a cold, calculating but irresistable piece of jailbait, along the lines of Too Low For Zero’s ‘Whipping Boy,’ but with a better hook and heavier sound. This brings what we old folks used to call ‘side one’ to and end.

    But those days are past, no? There are no more sides; now there are only whole records and songs. Either way, the album continues with ‘Passenger,’ a song that Americans generally just wouldn’t understand- or should I say, wouldn’t have understood before airline security got beefed up to the point where waiting in long lines has become more a part of our lifestyle. It’s actually a whimsical, mid-tempo tune about standing in line for the trains that make travelling around Europe so much easier than getting around this self-centred, car-obsessed country, a song that illustrates the monotony of the situation without becoming overly monotonous itself. ‘In Neon’ follows, a nice ballad about dreams of Hollywood success. The energy picks up again on ‘Burning Buildings,’ a song that represents taking the love-plunge as akin to leaping from a flaming skyscraper. A bit on the melodramatic side, but a good song nonetheless. ‘Did He Shoot Her?’ is the follow-up, an excellent piece of fast-paced, rhythmic rock that tells a story of getting revenge on some creep who’s hurt a beloved ex. The last track here is the best-known, ‘Sad Songs (Say So Much)’ Like the rest of the record, it is incongruously upbeat; perhaps this is all meant ironically (either that, or it’s an excuse for the over-long and kinda depressing ‘Blue Moves’ 8 years earlier); heaven knows Taupin loves his irony. So, to conclude, Breaking Hearts is a mid-eighties Elton John record that doesn’t deserve to be consigned to the television time capsule that contains most of 1984; it is a well-crafted, consistently engaging record with enough hooks to provide spare hands for a whole fleet of pirates. It boggles my mind that the year in which it was made is now twenty-two years in the past! To put it in perspecitve: if Breaking hearts were a person, it would be graduating from college this year! And I’m sure that, if it were, it would’ve graduated with flying colours.

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  • Father Of Two says:
    10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Groovy Sixties Look, Groovy Sixties Feel, December 6, 2015
    By 
    Father Of Two (Seattle, WA) –
    Verified Purchase(https://www.amazon.com/gp/community-help/amazon-verified-purchase/168-1655744-4495334', ‘AmazonHelp’, ‘width=400,height=500,resizable=1,scrollbars=1,toolbar=0,status=1′);return false; “>What’s this?)
    These Lennon-style sunglasses made my Halloween hippie costume complete. They are of good quality and were comfortable to wear for the whole evening.

    The one oddity was that my eyes really adapted to the lenses, and when I removed the glasses at the end of the party, everything looked yellowish for a few minutes to my naked eye. A natural, drug-free hallucinogenic – far out, man!!

    These shades look good, they’re well made, and they give you a cheap visual psychadelic experience. Radical!

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  • Amazon Customer says:
    6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    I absolutely LOVE them!
  • kenneth dennis says:
    5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Instant buy, April 19, 2015
    By 
    This review is from: Hipster Fashion Small Metal Round Circle Ozzy Elton Color Tint Lennon Style Sunglasses
    Cool shades that are very reminiscent of Matt Murdock’s shades. Instant buy for me as a Daredevil fan.
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