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Wish You Were Here

Wish You Were Here

  • Record Label: EMI
  • Catalog#: 50999 028945 2 2
  • Country Of Release: EU
  • Year Of Release: 2011

On its release in 1975 Wish You Were here topped the album charts in both the UK and the US. Reflecting the band’s thoughts of the time on the music business, and exploring themes of absence, Wish You Were Here contains the classic cut Shine On You Crazy Diamond, a tribute to founder member Syd Barrett. The new Discovery version presents the original studio album, digitally remastered by James Guthrie and reissued with newly designed Digipak and a new 16 page booklet designed by Storm Thorgerson.

 

The ‘Discovery’ collection: 14 Remastered Studio Albums

Since 1967 Pink Floyd have produced one of the most outstanding and enduring catalogues in the history of recorded music. All 14 original Studio albums have now been painstakingly digitally remastered by James Guthrie (co-producer of The Wall), and are reissued with newly crafted packaging and booklets created by the band’s long-time artwork collaborator Storm Thorgerson.

‘Discovery’ albums are designed as an introduction to the artist, with all booklets including full album lyrics.

List Price: $ 8.64

Price: $ 10.38

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3 Responses to Wish You Were Here

  • apairofpetducks says:
    4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    We all know what a great album this is, December 12, 2016
    By 
    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Wish You Were Here (Vinyl)
    We all know what a great album this is; no need for me to go into that. I wanted to address the packaging. This was purchased to frame, so I was distressed when I opened it because it’s the 2016 reissue with a black background/center graphic instead of the iconic cover I was expecting. Fear not! The black sleeve has a flap and out came the album cover I wanted on my wall.
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  • Zer-o-jimm says:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    The sound experience you get is well worth the cost., May 29, 2017
    By 
    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    I bought the set mainly for the surround and quad versions of the album. It took me some time before I broke down and actually bought the set because of the cost. It’s a lot of money to spend for a different version of an album I already own. After listening to it though, it was well worth the expense. This is truly how Pink Floyd should be experienced, with the music all around you. While the surround mix sounds great and is probably a little crisper, I prefer the quad mix. The music seems to envelop you more with this version. Considering the album was recorded in the 70′s, I’m amazed at how clean the sound is.

    If you’re on the fence about purchasing the set, just do it! As good as the Pink Floyd experience is in stereo, it’s phenomenal in surround and quad.

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  • Anonymous says:
    3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Are You Experienced?, February 5, 2017
    By 
    Zer-o-jimm (Massachusetts) –
    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    Wish You Were Here is frequently referred to as the best Pink Floyd album, by fans and by half the band. It isn’t my favorite, but I would still put it somewhere in the top 5 out of the 15 Floyd official studio albums.
    It contains one of the greatest elegies in classic rock, or any genre, in the form of Shine On You Crazy Diamond. The only thing that subtracts from it is the fact (and by “the fact” I mean “my dumb opinion”) that parts 8 and 9 seem real unfocused and low on ideas compared to the rest of the thing.

    Shine On is a behemoth and it dominates the majority of the album. But the other three songs all stand up; I’d categorize them all as classics. Really, with that in mind, it’s no surprise how many people say this is their best. They’re highly distinct from each other: Welcome to the Machine is cold, industrial progressive rock, albeit with acoustic guitars, Have a Cigar is futuristic electric Blues-rock, and Wish You Were Here is like an English stoner’s version of the Country & Western genre. While the songs are thematically connected, the extreme musical differences between all of them, gives Wish You Were Here a disconnected patchwork quality. The contrast between, say, Have a Cigar and the title track, for example, are so jarring that it sounds like two different bands. I suppose this is appropriate for a band that’s said to have been struggling with its own identity by the mid 70′s. This apparent disconnectedness works to the album’s advantage, making it seem a bit like a nonlinear, surrealist TV or radio drama.

    Lyrically, you’re dealing with a seriously haunted record. It’s Roger Waters trademark mixture of human compassion and mechanized cynicism at its most focused. The guy’s heart is clearly being pulled in at least two or three directions, and it’s messing with the essence of his very soul. If the album could speak it’d say something a bit like this: “Look what they’ve done to us. Look what they did to Syd Barrett. Look what we did to ourselves. Look what we did to Syd Barrett. Get us out of here, we just want to be a band again.”

    Anyway, right, the bonus material. The coolest cuts on the bonus disc are Raving & Drooling and You’ve Gotta Be Crazy. They’re not quite “lost” songs because they turned into Sheep and Dogs, respectively, but they’re different enough from those songs to be pretty fascinating. Without the Orwellian stuff that would later be added, the songs fit in well with the themes of Wish You Were Here. You’ve Gotta Be Crazy is about sacrificing your sanity to get ahead, to be a “success”. Once again there’s that underlying, unspoken message: “For God’s sake, get us out of here.” Raving & Drooling, meanwhile, is brutal-sounding song about the violence of human nature, and the act of “pretending the rest are not real”. Without the comical “Sheep” metaphor it’s quite disturbing for mid-70′s Pink Floyd, a sort of sonic portrait of a full-on psychopath. In addition to those two there’s a version of Have a Cigar with Roger’s originally vocals on it, the ones he was unsatisfied with and replaced with Roy Harper. I like it better than the version that made the cut. The alternate take of the title track, with the violins, and the live version of Shine On, performed in its entirety, are also great. The two-minute ‘wine-glasses’ instrumental is kind of underwhelming; it just sounds like the first movement of Shine On You Crazy Diamond, standing on its own.

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